registered professional lobbyists in Poland

persons performing professional lobbying activities in the Polish Parliament

professional lobbying contacts

Polish lobbyists in the European Union

Latest blog post.

Ignorance of the law is harmful

Krzysztof Izdebski, ePanstwo Foundation Ignorance of the law is harmful, of course. If you break the law even without realizing it, you can be held liable. It is worth noting, however, that there is an interesting aspect related to this popular saying in the context of lobbying and lobbyists. Ignorance of the law is harmful to their image.

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FAQ.

Lobbying is a lawful exercise of influence on authorities. Lobbying can be direct (e.g. meetings with ministers and deputies) or indirect (running media campaigns). Widely understood lobbying activities can be conducted by entrepreneurs, NGOs or even ordinary citizens. Lobbying activities consist in influencing authorities by providing them with arguments and information to convince them to a specific point of view.Lobbying is a positive phenomenon in a democratic system as long as it is transparent, controlled and accessible to everyone. When these elements are missing, on the fringe of lobbying activities, pathologies may arise, including conflicts of interest and even corruption.Go to  "Law and Recommendations" section to find out how lobbying is defined in Poland and abroad. 
A lobbyist is a person or entity carrying out lobbying activities, i.e. trying to persuade authorities to take action in a certain direction (e.g. passing a new law, issuing a regulation or an administrative decision). A lobbyist can be considered both a paid professional for a third party, an employee lobbying for their company, an entrepreneur acting on their own behalf, or a representative of a non-governmental organization acting in the public interest. To learn how the Polish law defines a lobbyist and who is considered one in other countries, please refer to the relevant section.
Legislative footprint is the information about how a given legal regulation or decision was made and who influenced it besides politicians and officials. Such information should include among other things, documents prepared by lobbyists, information on their meetings with officials and politicians, the legal records that were influenced, and on whose behalf they acted. The legislative footprint  should be annexed, e.g. to the bill, and at the same time be an integral part of the lobby register.
A lobbying register is a database of all lobby information. It should include the identities of individual lobbyists, information about their activities, meetings, and documents prepared for the authorities. It should also include information on the lobbyists’ clients, as well as financial records of lobbying activities. The register should integrate all officially published sources of lobbying information in one searchable database. Where to find the registers and what is their scope? Go to "Law and Recommendations" to find out more.
Revolving door is a phenomenon in which either politicians go out to the world of big business and become, e.g. lobbyists, or lobbyists enter the world of politics. These seat swaps can lead to conflicts of interest and eventually be harmful to the society. This is why former politicians undergo a cooling-off period during which they must not work as lobbyists.

About lobbying.

Lobbying is an essential part of the democratic process through which citizens may make their views on public policy and public services known to politicians and public servants.

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Standards Commission

Regulation of Lobbying Act 2015: Guidance for people carrying on lobbying activities

Lobbyists can help bring important issues to the attention of the European institutions.

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European Commission

Green Paper - European transparency initiative (COM/2006/0194 final)

Secrecy policy results in bad policies; transparency is not a guarantee, but it raises the bar.

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Kazimierz Michał Ujazdowski

Member of the European Parliament

Lobbying is a legitimate way of influencing public authorities by representatives of different interest groups, in particular business representatives, private companies.

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CBOS

Konflikty interesów i lobbing – dylematy polityków

Lobbying is a legitimate part of the democratic system, regardless of whether it is carried out by individual citizens or companies, civil society organisations and other interest groups or firms working on behalf of third parties (public affairs professionals, think-tanks and lawyers).

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European Commission

Green Paper - European transparency initiative (COM/2006/0194 final)

The essence of lobbying involves solicited communication, oral or written, with a public official to influence legislation, policy or administrative decisions

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OECD

Lobbyists, government and public trust: Promoting integrity by self-regulation

Non-transparent, one-sided lobbying poses a significant threat to policy-making and to the public interest.

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Sven Giegold

Member of the European Parliament

Lobbying is a global multi-billion dollar business that employs a considerable number of individuals.

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OECD

Transparency and integrity in lobbying

Lobbying is a legitimate and valuable activity. It is a crucial part of a healthy democracy. […] The reality is that the more voices that inform the Government and the Parliament’s thinking […], the more informed we are to legislate, to develop new policy and to scrutinise.

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The Scottish Parliament

1st Report, 2015 (Session 4), Proposal for a register of lobbying activity